Primary Sources

“This is a Christian institution and we will tolerate no Jews here”: The Brooklyn Interns Hazing Episodes of 1916 & 1927: Lecture, October 10

1 minute reading time

Join us on Wednesday, October 10 at 6pm when Dr. Edward Halperin kicks off the 2018/19 History of the Health Sciences Lecture Series with “This is a Christian institution and we will tolerate no Jews here”: The Brooklyn Interns Hazing Episodes of 1916 & 1927.

Play Ball!

2 minutes reading time

Archives & Special Collections recently received a delightful and interesting donation: a scorecard for the 1935 Presbyterian Hospital baseball team.  Four pages long and measuring 10” by 7 ½”, it’s more substantial than these items tend to be and it contains a surprising amount of information for such an ephemeral piece.

Nursing School Alumni Magazine Now Available Online

2 minutes reading time

Archives & Special Collections at the Columbia University Augustus C. Long Health Sciences Library is pleased to announce the digitization of the Quarterly Magazine, the publication of the Columbia University-Presbyterian Hospital School of Nursing Alumni Association.  The issues included date from 1906, when the magazine was established, through 1952 with the exception of the 1922-26 volumes which were too fragile to digitize.

“In A Most Dirty and Deranged Condition…” – the P&S Library in 1837

3 minutes reading time

The College of Physicians & Surgeons (now the Vagelos College of Physicians & Surgeons) moved uptown in 1837 to Crosby St. after having been located on Barclay St. near City Hall for almost a quarter century.  Along with its anatomical museum and chemical apparatus, the medical school also brought its library with it to its new home.   Perhaps motivated by the new surroundings, recent P&S graduate Nelson Shook, Class of 1835, agreed to undertake – for free – an inventory and reshelving of the library’s contents.

Mary Sherwood and the Struggle for Women's Medical Education

2 minutes reading time

The story of American women’s efforts to become physicians is well-known and has been often told: Elizabeth Blackwell’s graduation from the Geneva Medical College in 1849  -- the first woman to receive a medical degree; the founding of the first women’s medical college, the New England Female Medical College in 1848; the opening of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine as a coeducational institution in 1893, and so on.